Park Plan Status as of April 12, 2022

(See FBMUD118 website under RESOURCES / DOCUMENTS / PROJECT DOCUMENTS for more information on each park project.)

The District completed numerous capital projects intended to improve the quality of life within the District and promote water conservation. These include the addition of a walking/jogging trail around Figure Four Lake, a children’s splash pad area, a new playground, a pavilion, a village park playground, and a reclaimed water irrigation system to serve the community’s greenspace areas. The list below summarizes the projects complete by Fort Bend County Mud No. 118.

 

FBCMUD 118 Projects
Substantial Completion Final Completion
Barski Playground 7/3/2018 8/30/2018
Splash Pad 8/31/2018 10/30/2018
Barski Pavilion 8/31/2018 8/30/2018
Jogging Trail Phase I 10/2/2018 1/2/2019
Reclaimed Water Phase I 2/9/2019 1/20/2020
Jogging Trail Phase 2 2/15/2021 3/1/2021
Jogging Trail Phase 3 5/28/2020 8/25/2020
Playground at Waterside Village Park 11/6/2019 11/19/2019
Irrigation System Improvements 1/15/2020
Parking Lot near Lost Lake & Waterside Estates Circle 4/1/2022 4/12/2022
Landscaping Improvements & Gazebo at Figure Four Lake Anticipated September 2022 **


Final Park Improvements (PDF)

How To Prevent Stormwater Pollution

What is stormwater?

Stormwater is water from rain or melting snow that does not soak into the ground. It flows from rooftops, over paved areas, bare soil, and sloped lawns. As it flows, stormwater runoff collects and transports soil, animal waste, salt, pesticides, fertilizers, oil and grease, debris and other potential pollutants.

What is the problem?

Rain and snowmelt wash pollutants from streets, construction sites, and land into storm sewers and ditches. Eventually, the storm sewers and ditches empty the polluted stormwater directly into streams and rivers without prior purification or treatment. This is stormwater pollution.
Polluted stormwater degrades our lakes, rivers, wetlands and other waterways. Nutrients such as phosphorous and nitrogen can cause the overgrowth of algae, resulting in oxygen depletion in waterways. Toxic substances from motor vehicles and careless application of pesticides and fertilizers threaten water quality and can kill fish and other aquatic life. Bacteria from animal wastes and improper connections to storm sewer systems can make lakes and waterways unsafe for wading, swimming and fish consumption. Eroded soil is a pollutant as well. It clouds the waterway and interferes with the habitat of fish and plant life.

Tips to Prevent Stormwater Pollution

  • Cover and contain topsoil and mulch during installation.
  • Pick up animal waste.
  • Reconsider using toxic asphalt sealers, seal cracks only.
  • Do not drain swimming pools into storm drains or road ditches.
  • Reduce winter salt application.
  • Compost or mulch leaves and yard debris rather than hauling to dumps.
  • Dispose of automotive fluids appropriately.
  • Remove litter from streets, sidewalks, and stormgates adjacent to your property.
  • Sweep litter and debris from driveways and parking lots rather than hosing debris into storm drains.
  • Water the lawn, not the sidewalk and driveway.
  • Reduce paved surfaces.
  • Triple rinse and recycle empty pesticide and fertilizer containers.
  • Avoid using chemicals near waterways or storm drains.
  • Clean up spills immediately and properly dispose of cleanup materials.
  • Avoid spraying pesticides/fertilizers in windy conditions or when rain is in the forecast.
  • Fill pesticide/fertilizer tanks on a gravel surface, away from storm drains, sewers or ditches.

Notice Regarding Playgrounds, Splash Pad and Park Equipment

Fort Bend County MUD No. 118 is continuing to monitor developments related to the new coronavirus (COVID-19) epidemic. In accordance with state and local reopening guidance, the splash pad and playgrounds will reopen on Wednesday, July 01, 2020. However, please be advised that park and playground equipment is not disinfected; use is at your own risk.  Further, the District encourages all residents to continue to follow guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and all local public health officials for the most up-to-date information.

Park Use Guidelines

The District appreciates your cooperation in exercising good hygiene and best practices to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and reduce ways the virus is transmitted. Visitors to District parks should adhere to the following guidelines.

  • Follow the CDC’s guidance on personal hygiene prior to heading to parks – wash hands, carry hand sanitizer, do not use parks or trails and facilities if you have symptoms, cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, etc.
  • Individuals should maintain 6 feet of separation from others outside the individual’s group and from homeowner fences. A group is defined as no more than 10 persons including the members of the household and those persons who traveled together to the park.
  • All District playground and splash pad equipment, picnic tables and other commonly touched surfaces are open but not disinfected; use is at your own risk.
  • Warn other park users of your presence and as you pass to allow proper distance, and step off trails and sidewalks to allow others to pass, keeping minimum recommended distances at all times. Signal your presence with your voice, bell or horn.
  • Bring water or drinks — public drinking fountains may be disabled and should not be used, even if operable.
  • Consistent with the actions taken by many individuals across the state, consider wearing cloth face coverings (over the nose and mouth) when within 6 feet of another person who is not a member of the individual’s group.